Dr. Nathan Young of UCSF with Charles Darwin, courtesy of Dr. Young

Summary

Dr. Nathan Young of UCSF discuss evolutionary developmental biology using the limb as a model to understand the perspective. We talk about the importance of marrying all three disciplines to discover insights that otherwise wouldn’t be within the purview of a single field.

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Dr. Eric Bartelink of CSU – Chico, courtesy of himself

Summary

Dr. Eric Bartelink of CSU – Chico guides us through an intro to stable isotope analysis, and how it can be used in forensic and historic or ancient contexts to understand how people migrated and what their diets were like. Dr. Bartelink highlights the importance of embracing a multi-disciplinary approach to advancing anthropology. 

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Dr. Sean Tallman in his AAPA Pride shirt! Photo courtesy of Dr. Tallman

Summary

Dr. Sean Tallman talks about crafting new metric and nonmetric methods for sex estimation in modern populations — especially in groups that have been historically ignored or conflated with others in the past. Additionally, Dr. Tallman shares his research on the current state of diversity and inclusion in forensics and biological anthropology. We also discuss: How can diversity shift how research is done? What are some ways to make the field more inclusive?

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Dr. Barbara King with Cynthia Goat at Farm Sanctuary in NY. Photo credit: Charles Hogg.

Summary

Dr. Barbara J. King joins the show to discuss animal cognition and emotion. Along the way, we hear about her start in biological anthropology studying baboons and how her career shifted several times to focus on animal cognition more broadly, followed by a turn towards advocacy and science communication. 

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Chris Aris, courtesy of himself

Summary

Chris Aris is a PhD candidate at the University of Kent in the UK. In this week’s episode, we discuss grad school survival strategies, mental health, the differences between the US and UK grad school systems, choosing the right path for you, and some of the things we wish we’d known before we went to grad school. Plus, teeth and sexual dimorphism!

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Summary

Jill McCormick is a historic preservation officer working for the Quechan Tribe near Yuma, Arizona. This week, she joins the show to discuss what it’s like to be an archaeologist trying to preserve Tribal history, Tribal perspectives on working with CRM archaeology firms, and how folks can get involved if they’re interested. 

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Chris Webster in the field, courtesy of Mr. Webster

Summary

Meet Chris Webster, a CRM archaeologist, anthropology podcast mogul, and all-around hustler. He joins the show to give a different perspective on making a career out of anthropology and what it’s like to work in commercial settings as a cultural resource management archaeologist. Webster also discusses what it’s like working with biological anthropologists and tribal monitors. 

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Dr. Tanya Smith with a lemur, courtesy of Dr. Smith

Summary

Dr. Tanya Smith of Griffith University talks about teeth — everything from individual development to using teeth to understand past environments and lifestyles. She also talks about some of the cultural practices surrounding teeth.

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Dr. Daniel Lieberman, courtesy of himself.

Summary

Dr. Daniel Lieberman of Harvard talks about considering human evolution through adaptations to run. He also explains mismatch diseases and the types of preventative care we can take to keep ourselves healthy. We also chat about diversity and the importance of including your study population in your work. 

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Figure courtesy of Dr. David Raichlen from his article in Trends in Neurosciences

Summary

Dr. David Raichlen of USC talks about using evolutionary biology to understand modern health consequences. For example, can aerobic exercise paired with mental stimulation result in the formation of neurons? If so, why? And how can we apply that information to helping modern humans live healthier lives?

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